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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
. not to cross it, because that might bring china into the war. not to do anything to aggravate russia. russia was greedy for any colonies, anything it could grab. and i am not going to give you the atom bomb. you are not going to be able to use it. three things he was told. macarthur said, do not worry, the chinese are not coming in. he got our army up to the 38th parallel. a decision was made. the white house knew -- they decided to cross the parallel to get into north korea and destroy the north korean army. this was an agreed upon decision. we did indeed push back the north koreans. but it triggered the chinese, who came rushing in, hundreds of thousands, truman said, i was promised they would not come in. intelligence told macarthur this would not happen. here we are, fighting hundreds of thousands of chinese. they pushed us all the way back. >> back to seoul? >> beyond. they took seoul back. macarthur started to give press conferences. he asked for the use of the bomb. truman said now. truman did not think -- instead of calling macarthur back, he decided to fly to wake island. he sat wit
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charge
employers and job seekers. >>> a corruption case in russia has brought down a top government official. president vladimir putin has fired the defense minister, anatoly under suspicion for his alleged involvement in a massive fraud case. putin appointed a new defense minister. the president referred to an ongoing probe into alleged fraud at a defense ministry affiliate. he said he decided to fire him to create conditions for an objective investigation into all matters. the case involves the sale of ministry property allegedly at prices far below market value. the transaction resulted in losses of more than $93 million. authorities are questioning of his aides, a female executive, at the affiliate. he became defense minister in 2007. he worked on organization reforms and reduced military personnel, mainly officers. the military criticized him for that. analysts say putin hopes to improve public support for his government by replacing him with the popular shoigu. >>> a group of south korean parents have been charged with obtaining fake foreign passports for their children. they wanted to
's re-election will have a positive impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two leaders are divided over how to deal with iran's nuclear ambitions. the u.s. is urging netanyahu not to take military action. palestinian president mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the elite officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who have been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. and the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of
's recovering from her injuries in britain. >>> the leaders of vietnam and russia have agreed to talk sea trade talks next year. russian prime minister and his counterpart announced the plan on wednesday in hanoi. economic and trade cooperation between the two countries has been steadily rising. medved said he hopes to get an increase in bilateral trade, that would bring total trade to about $7 billion in 2015. the two leaders also agreed to boost military cooperation. vietnam is engaged in territorial disputes with china in the south china sea. it's keen to bolster defenses amid china's growing maritime presence. >>> and that's going to do it for us this week. thanks for watching. we'll see you again next week on "asia 7 days."
but said he hopes the pe impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two are divided over how to deal with israel's. mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the lead officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who had been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of the congress to confirm details of this year's gathering. nhk world's michitaka yamaka in beijing has more. >> reporter: chinese
, the house had one bill on the agenda, the bill that would normalize u.s. trade relations with russia and that passed by a vote of 365-43. the senate has yet to take up their version of the measure. a capitol hill reporter fills in the details. >> sports of this bill normalizing trade relations with russia are saying it's long overdue and good for the nation's economy. why is that? >> well, it >> it will hopefully double exports to russia from the united states. it will go across a broad group of products. manufacturers are backing it strongly. it could be airplanes and parts associated with that. locomotives, chemicals, food, clothing. it seems russia likes u.s. products. we expect there to be good and quick growth. >> how is lining up to oppose it? >> it has wide support on capitol hill. even the administration backs the bill. it does seem to have broad support across washington and the country for businesses that want to export products to russia. >> with all of the legislation and that remains to be done in the lame-duck session, this is the first one. what are the prospects in th
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya. i'm don lemon. see you back here at 10 p.m. eastern. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your
. >> he was born in russia when his father was with the russian military. >> by the early 1980s he had significant niche for himself in the structure. >> kim jong-il was a character of fun to a lot of people in the western world because he was short and had that boof fant style hair and wore elevator shoes but he was in truth a very brutal dictator. >> he has expensive taste in everything from alcohol to t cigarettes to expensive boats. >> it was reported he liked american culture. >> he loved american film. he supposedly had a library of many thousands of films. he once had a south korean actress, favorite south korean actress abducted. she was kidnapped from a beach in hong kong and taken to north korea and required to become basically his actress slave. >> they had kidnapping of people that's how they went about it with film and with migrate uncle. >> mick kim's own familiar licks combreernsed the cruelty of the north korean regime. >> migrate uncle was a lead engineer. >> grandmother's mother. >> my mom and others and my family told me about how during the korean war the north kore
on in the distribution of the economy and china, conditions in russia. there are a number of problems anew environment. we have not developed a coherent approach because in the first term you learn your job. that is the challenge that the administration is facing. >> people look to the united states for leadership. they look to us because we have for so long been in a position where we've been able because of our resources and military strength, because of our values, we've been able to keep the peace. we have been able to make sure that enemies feared us and make sure allies could count on us. with we step back as we did during president obama's first term and i'm afraid we're going to do the next term ease back and you see when there a vacuum. people that don't share our interests diving into that vacuum. >> i traveled all over the middle east. every leader i talked to believe the united states is weak in leaving. they are having to accommodate to that eventuality. whether it be the saudis or you name the country they are accommodating to american weakness and withdrawal. that means that they accomm
mother gavebi birth is today a shrine. >> in fact, he was born in russia when his father was with the russian military. >> by the early 1980s, it seems that they had carved out a really significant niche himself within the power structure. >> kim jong il was a character of fun to a lot of people in the western world because he was short and had that bea bouffantr and wore elevator shoes. he was, in truth, an incredible dictator. >> it a was often reported thate liked american culture. >> he loved american film. he supposedly had a library of many thousands of films. he once had a south korean actress, his favorite south korean actress, abducted. she was kidnapped from a beach in hong konged and taken to norh korea and required to become basically his actress slave. >> they have a history and trend of kidnapping people. that's how they went about that, with film, and that's how they went about it with my great uncle. >> chicago native mike kim's own family has experienced the cruelty of the north korean regime. y great uncle was a leading engineer. >> that would be your gr
mother gave birth is today a shrine. >> in fact he was born in russia when his father was with the russian military. >> by the early 1980s it seemed that he had carved out a really significant niche for himself within the power structure. >> kim jong-il was a character of fun to a lot of people in the western world. because he was short and had that bouffant hair and wore elevator shoes. he was in truth a very brutal dictator. >> he has incredibly expensive taste in everything from alcohol to cigarettes to expensive boats. >> it was reported he loved american culture. >> he loved american culture. he had a library of many thousands of films. he once had a south korean actress, his favorite south korean actress abducted. she was kidnapped from the beach in hong kong and taken to north korea and required to become basically his actress slave. >> he had a history of kidnapping people. that's how -- inaudible) >> his own family experienced the cruelty of the north korean regime. >> migrate uncle was a leading engineer. >> your grandmother's brother. >> my mom and others in
, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. and in fact, they were working on that. the fact that it did fail and we have no continuing presence in iraq i think is part of the reason why iran's influences spread there and so incidentally has al qaeda re- emerged again. i think those are warnings to us about how important it is to do exactly what you have called for, which is to have a good -- much smaller but
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
it from three sides, britain, russia, the u.s. it's a whole different ball game when you look at three interests. russian eyes, english eyes, chinese eyes. if you can see history and have empathy for others, you broaden your compassion, and you broaden. we become a member of the world. of the global community. and this is what obama has not done. now, he's basically operating as an outlier now. you asked about our criticism, it's couched in the context of 120 years of history. we started in 1900, we end now. it's a lot. and we start -- we mentioned woodrow wilson, world war ii, saying america is the savior of the world. we show that this mission to be a global policeman starts a long time ago. but it grows dangerous after the atomic bomb in 1945. >> it's a fascinating project. thoroughly enjoy the book. it's a riveting history lesson. you bring this stuff to life. i commend you. >> thank you. >> the unhold history of the united states is on showtime. the book is available now. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] you build a reputation by not breaking down. consider the silverado 15
with russia and south korea. securing important resources in the south china sea as well as potentially destabilizing or creating a situation in which china doesn't actually have full control of the south china sea for its exports and imports of oil and other natural resources into china. so the issue for the two countries is that being driven by very different factors. >> i know japanese businesses have sort of started to think about the cost benefit of doing business in china because the chinese government has demonstrated their ability to impact business. so i was talking to -- let's he's bring in andrew on this. i suppose the question is whether the chinese are feeling any pinch on their side. >> trade is not everything. don't forget it's not just a financial issue only between china and japan. don't forget the american pivot to asia has complicated things. and also of raising nationalism both in japan and china. a look at japanese politics recently, the current administration has weakened very much by the economy, but also by the rise of another political party and the political pa
, where they were born and raised in russia and they inherited a lot of money and they are actually communists. so all the republican party kind of liens on their side. money is not given away -- some people just give money away or they loan it to you, but if you are going to give money for a republican to win, to buy a governor or a president, there is something you want back. all of these republicans better take in mind that they could be voting for a communist which is a movement coming into our country. the documentary says -- host: where did you see the documentary? caller: national geographic. from noon until 6:00, and half of it was about the koch brothers. but you saw it on the national geographic jenna? larry sabato, any response? guest: i am just on to say this. i never met the koch brothers and i never -- never corresponded with them. i've got news for you. they are not communists. i am pretty sure of that. so, let me just correct the record, and i think we should go on. host: how often do voters split tickets in virginia? guest: a very good question. virginia was once th
phone, we brought in china, india and russia. again, secretary of state would have to go two or three times a year. we also articulate we would maintain our force levels. we got off to a good start. but i can only say that we partially succeeded in elevating the importance of asia. partly because even i was at the time in his and other economies was coming, was not crystal-clear as it is today. and partly because secretary and the president kept getting dragged akin to other issues. you asked about the presence the. he thought the issue was important. he realized the importance of trade and so on. the first couple years of his initiation of clinton focus on the domestic economy which by the what was the most single important thing you can do for your foreign policy, above all today. so, and christopher spent a lot of time in asia and went out, secretary christopher, to the region, but he often would get subsumed in the bosnia crisis. we have somalia and haiti and other crises in the middle east. and so although we raise the profile, i don't think we were able to succeed, certainly as
architect the region -- we brought in china, india, russia. i'm not the prime minister and the secretary of state would have go two or three times a year. we articulated we're going main tape the force level. we got off to a good start, but i can only say that we partially succeeded in the elevating the asia. the dynamism of the economy it was not as clear as it is today. and partly because the secretary of the president kept getting dragged back in to other issues. you asked about president's view. he thought asia was important. he was obviously an economic animal and realized the important of the trade and so on. but the first [inaudible] focused on the domestic economy which, by the way, a single most important thing you can do for the foreign policy. above all today. so and christopher spent a lot of time in asia went out secretary christopher to the region but he often would get -- bosnia crisis, we had somalia and haiti and other crisis and the middle east, and a lot we raised property file, indon't think we were able to succeed as certainly kurt succeeded with the great admiration
box there, bar is the aggregate of all of our potential challenger states including china and russia. it is a four to one advantage that we presently enjoy. if we rolled back to the cold war period, what you would see instead is the purple bar and the adversary bar were about equal. so what we've done is we've established over the past 20 years, we've established a four to one advantage in spending over our principal, um, and potential military competitors. when we hear that we can't reduce spending by 13%, what we're actually saying is that having a four to one advantage is not sufficient to allow a 13% rollback. this is the slide you saw initially, um, and again, it illustrates how national defense budget authority has changed over the past 60 years. at the very end of that slide, you'll see this purple line. that, the difference between these two illustrates what sequestration would do to the military. it is true that there's something of a cliff there. there's a cliff anyway, and that's in part because this chart does not take into account future war spending. we don't know what
with syria and russia. this is just over an hour. >> i am going to be very brief in introducing our two panelists. i think they are -- i am also going to be in the discussion, for which jonathan promised me two cookies instead of one, for doing double duty. i am not going to say anything substantive about this panel other than looking at the u.s. side of things and the regional side of things, they mesh very well and they also mesh with the first panel. i think we all know jeffrey. the founding director of the thornton center and the senior director at the nfc under president obama for the first two plus years i guess. he has written, by the way, a wonderful book accounting that time, which i think is probably available in the brookings bookstore, and which is probably a great read. jonathan is the current acting director of the thornton center, somebody i must say that, on a personal level, when he was out in the wilds of california, some place beyond the appellation, i think, i used to turn to his right things to understand what was going on in northeast asia. i did not know him, but
, first and foremost with a 49 capitals of the coalition. i also think the other capitals, iran, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by signing a bilateral security agreement. more important, signing an agreement reflecting the commitment that was initially made in may 2012. >> i think it's a very important answer, and i have the same feeling, i think islamabad is the first couple that we affected by the pilots who could agreement, the whole argument refer to that part of the reason they continue to be tied to some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups like haqqani network and haqqani network and i is eyes, as they're hedging their bets for what happened the day after we leave if we're not leaving. presumably. they lose that argument. but there is, every situation is different, i can't help but relate this to iraq, that it seemed to me that nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for our presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. in fact, they were working on that,
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)